What’s on the ballot

Here’s the truth: I don’t have time to write this.

Right now, I have 40 more essays to grade, four more weeks of lessons to plan, and meetings with students four days this week.

Here’s the truth: I need to write this.

It goes without saying that this year has been hard. This semester has been hard, too. This morning, I woke up to fifteen emails from students. They are tired. They are overwhelmed. They are angry.

One student’s family has lost their apartment. Her mom has been laid off work. She has no computer now.

Another student is a working father who now has Covid and is out of work.

I feel them. I’m drained and overworked. For the last week I have been especially angry and anxious. I’m anxious about what the future holds for our country. For my family. For my school. For my job. For my students.

This year’s election is going to determine the outcome for all of these. Will Covid continue to ravage our country and businesses and families and schools? Will we have jobs? Will our students have the support they need? Will we have access to good education? Good healthcare? Will people in this country be valued? Be respected? Be equal?

I’m tired of people fighting on political party lines. This election is not about republicans vs. democrats. It’s about decency and the future of our country.

It’s about people. People like my students. People like me and my colleagues who are working and fighting hard. People like many of my family who grew up in poverty and struggle everyday to make ends meet, to access good healthcare. Who often have to choose between their health needs and food on the table.

Ironically, (or maybe not), it’s often these people who have been manipulated and used by the current administration and who continue to support it anyway.

This election is about all of us. Consider the people in this country when you vote. It’s not two political candidates’ names on that ballot. Imagine that it’s your friends’ names, your families’ names, your teachers’ names, your kids’ names, your colleagues’ names.

What kind America do you want them to have? What kind of education do you want them to have? What kind of healthcare? What kind of opportunities? What kind of future?

Don’t we all deserve better?