Updates, Book Deals, and What I’m Reading Now

It’s officially summer break, and as always, I have big plans and goals. One of those goals is to maintain a more consistent writing schedule here on the blog and for another project I have started working on.

The spring semester was rough for me, and I can’t quite put my finger on the problem. I wasn’t teaching as many classes and wasn’t quite as busy as I was in the fall, but I dealt with a lot of anxiety that affected me physically. Hence, very little writing.

summer readingFor my first post of the summer, I had planned to write about two YA novels I read recently. I have lots of feelings and thoughts about them, but this week has been a little crazy. My husband and I have been trying to renovate our 1920s house for years, but haven’t made much progress because the most significant and costly problem was the foundation. But, this week, a foundation repair crew is working under the house, hopefully resolving the issues that have prevented us from moving forward. Having a crew at the house means that my house has become very loud, and my schedule is completely off. Every time I sit down to write, I get distracted and can’t concentrate. So, instead of beating myself up about not writing the post I intended to write (I promise I will soon), I decided to begin with some updates, some e-book deals that you can’t miss, and what I’m reading now.  Continue reading

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Review: You Will Know Me

Megan Abbott is referred to as the “Queen Bee”by her fans, and for good reason. She has written several novels, many which fall into noir or mystery categories, and has received numerous awards, including Best Hardcover Novel of the Year from International Thriller Writers for The Fever (2015).  Abbott’s novels often focus on themes related to the social dynamics of young adulthood, of girlhood, sexuality, community hysteria, and the lines between child and adult.

you will know meIn her recent novel, You Will Know Me, Abbott continues to explore these themes, but departs from her usual convention of telling the story from the teenage girl’s perspective. Instead, the novel centers on the adults whose lives revolve around their daughters in the competitive world of gymnastics.  Continue reading

Siracusa: A Review

“In life one rarely knows which remarks of the hundreds uttered in the course of a day will turn out to be auspicious. In fiction, foreshadowing is planted and flagged in some (hopefully or desperately) subtle way, drama demands it.”

In July, I joined the Book of the Month Club, and I’m so glad I did. Each month, BOTM judges choose five books from which members can choose. Members receive one book as part of their membership, but they can also add additional books for $9.99. BOTM has allowed me to explore new titles that I maybe wouldn’t have purchased in hard cover, and so far, I have enjoyed both of the books I’ve chosen. Siracusa by Delia Ephron was my choice for August, and it has been moved to the top of the list of the best books I’ve read this summer–possibly this year (joining Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi).

siracusa

For those unfamiliar with Delia Ephron, she is a prolific and talented writer who is responsible for numerous plays, movies (including You’ve Got Mail and Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants), and books (like Sister, Mother, Husband, Dog and The Lion is in).

Siracusa recounts two couples’ travels in Italy and the disastrous consequences when secrets and betrayals are unveiled. Michael and Lizzie are writers from NYC. He is famous and award-winning and desperately trying to complete a novel that will reaffirm his talent. She is a not-so-successful journalist looking for the next big story.  They are joined on the trip by Lizzie’s college boyfriend, Finn, and his wife, Taylor. Snow, their pre-teen daughter, further complicates the awkward dynamics of the group.   Continue reading

Roses and Rot by Kat Howard

roses and rot

“Happily ever after is the dropping of a curtain, a signal for applause. It is not a guarantee, and it always has a price” (Howard).

I first heard of Roses and Rot by Kat Howard on the All the Books podcast. Liberty and Rebecca and the rest of the Book Riot team are partly responsible for my ever-growing TBR list. When I heard that it was a modern fairy tale, I rushed to find it. Fairy tales are my thing. Old ones, new ones, I don’t care. Then, I saw the mixed reviews. There are many people who love this book. But, there are just as many that were disappointed in it.

Roses and Rot is a debut novel by Kat Howard that retells the story of Tam Lin, a beloved Scottish folk ballad. The story follows two sisters, Imogen and Marin, one dark, one light, one a dancer, one a writer. After surviving an abusive childhood and being apart for many years, the sisters decide to apply together to an artist’s retreat called Melete.  In the beginning, Melete seems perfect, a place to reconnect with each other and to focus on their art. But, Melete is not all that it seems, and its glossy perfection is a mirage for deeper and darker magic. And it may demand more of the artists than they are willing to give. The sisters must, in the end, decide if art and success are worth the sacrifices they will have to make.  Continue reading